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First Time Trumpet Players
By Alex Beamer
8/4/2017 12:01:00 PM  

First Time Trumpet Players

The trumpet (and its very close cousin the cornet horn) add pep to any band. We are very excited that you have chosen it as your instrument! Whether you are a new music student or a parent of a music student, you will want to know these basics soon after receiving your instrument.


Parts of the Trumpet

Below is a diagram of the trumpet. Click on the image to enlarge it.

trumpet diagram


Assembling Your Instrument...CAREFULLY!

Even though it’s made of metal, your trumpet is delicate and should be handled with care. Follow these instructions or the instructions given to you by your music director to prevent damaging the instrument.

1. Place on a flat surface and open right side up.
2. Open the latches and carefully take out the instrument.
3. Carefully place the mouthpiece in the mouth receiver and tighten into place. Be careful not to over tighten.


Putting It All Away

1. Remove the mouthpiece by gently twisting it to the left and place it in the mouthpiece holder in your case.
2. If your mouthpiece gets stuck, seek help from your teacher or from West Music’s repair team. We have a special tool to remove a stuck mouthpiece that will not damage the instrument.
3. Press the water keys and gently blow air through the mouthpiece receiver to remove excess condensation.
4. Wipe off the outside with a soft cloth.
5. Carefully place the instrument in the case and close all the latches.
6. Store only your instrument and its accessories in the case. Sheet music, folders, and other objects may bend the keys and damage the instrument.


Related Articles


Have questions? Need advice? West Music is here for you! Give our school band experts a call at 800-373-2000. 


Adapted with permission from Alfred Music's Sound Innovations for Concert Band 1: Trumpet. 




Tags: band, beginner, trumpet, alex beamer
Categories: Band & Orchestra
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First Time Trombone Players
By Alex Beamer
8/4/2017 10:51:00 AM  

First Time Trombone Players

Congratulations on choosing to play the trombone. Whether you are new to playing music, new to the trombone, or a parent of a new music student, you will want to know these basics soon after receiving your instrument.


Parts of the Trombone

Below is a diagram of the trombone. Click on the image to enlarge it.

trombone diagram


Assembling Your Instrument...CAREFULLY!

Even though it’s made of metal, your trombone is delicate and should be handled with care. Follow these instructions or the instructions given to you by your music director to prevent damaging the instrument.

1. Place on a flat surface and open right side up.
2. Open the latches and carefully open the case.
3. Make sure the slide is locked.
4. Carefully hold the bell-half of the trombone with your left hand and the slide-half with your right.
5. Position the slide at a 90-degree angle in the slide receiver and tighten the bell lock, being careful not to over tighten.
6. Pull the tuning slide out about an inch.
7. Carefully place the mouthpiece in the mouth receiver and tighten. Again, do not over tighten.


Putting It All Away

1. Remove the mouthpiece by gently twisting it to the left and place it in the mouthpiece holder in your case.
2. If your mouthpiece gets stuck, seek help from your teacher or from West Music’s repair team. We have a special tool to remove a stuck mouthpiece that will not damage the instrument.
3. Press the water keys and gently blow air through the mouthpiece receiver to remove excess condensation.
4. Wipe off the outside with a soft cloth.
5. Carefully place the instrument in the case and close all the latches.
6. Store only your instrument and its accessories in the case. Sheet music, folders, and other objects may bend the keys and damage the instrument.


Related Articles


Have questions? Need advice? West Music is here for you! Give our school band experts a call at 800-373-2000. 


Adapted with permission from Alfred Music's Sound Innovations for Concert Band 1: Trombone.



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Categories: Band & Orchestra
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First Time Tenor Saxophone Players
By Alex Beamer
8/4/2017 10:38:00 AM  

First Time Tenor Saxophone Players

Congratulations on choosing to play the tenor saxophone. The saxophone, or “sax” as it’s often called, can be seen in all types of music. As a music student, or a parent of a music student, you will want to know these basics.


Alto vs Tenor Saxophones

Both the alto and tenor saxophones are part of the woodwind family, both use wooden reeds to create sound, and both make excellent beginner instruments! The major difference is that the tenor sax is larger than the alto and produces lower tones.


Parts of the Tenor Sax

Below is a diagram of the tenor saxophone. Click on the image to enlarge it.

tenor sax diagram


Assembling Your Saxophone…CAREFULLY!

1. Even though it’s made of metal, your saxophone is delicate and should be handled with care. Follow these instructions or the instructions given to you by your music director to prevent damaging the instrument.

2. Place on a steady surface right side up.

3. Open the case and find your neckstrap. Place the neckstrap over your head so the hook is in front and the pad is resting on the back of your neck.

4. Place the thin end of the reed into your mouth or a container of water to moisten it.

5. Remove the mouthpiece cap and ligature. Gently twist the mouthpiece onto the neck cork so about half the cork is visible. If needed, place a small amount of cork grease onto the neck cork. Be sure the flat part of the mouthpiece is facing down.

6. Add the ligature to the mouthpiece, then slide the thick end of the reed against the mouthpiece with the flat side against the rectangular opening. The reed should be centered and not extend above the top of the mouthpiece. Gently tighten the ligature screws to hold the reed in place.

7. Carefully lift the main body of the saxophone out of the case. Be careful not to hold it by the keys or rod.

8. Place the hook of the neckstrap into the ring on the back of the saxophone.

9. Remove the end cap from the upper opening in the main body and return it to your case. Loosen the neck screw.

10. Gently twist the neck into position. Do not rock the neck into place or try to twist in a full circle, and never hold the saxophone by its neck!

11. Once the connection with the octave key is in its correct position with the key on the neck closed, tighten the neck screw.

 

Putting It All Away

1. Remove the ligature and reed from the mouthpiece.

2. Place the reed in a reed case. This helps it dry properly and last longer.

3. Disassemble in reverse order of assembly. Use the saxophone swab to dry the inside of the instrument. Wipe off the outside with a soft cloth.

4. Carefully place the instrument in the case and close all the latches.

5. Store only your instrument and its accessories in the case. Sheet music, folders, and other objects may bend the keys and damage the instrument.


Related Articles


Have questions? Need advice? West Music is here for you! Give our school band experts a call at 800-373-2000. 


Adapted with permission from Alfred Music's Sound Innovations for Concert Band 1: Tenor Sax




Tags: band, beginner, tenor sax, saxophone, alex beamer
Categories: Band & Orchestra
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First Time Percussion Players
By Alex Beamer
8/3/2017 1:01:00 PM  

First Time Percussion Players

Congratulations on choosing to play percussion! Percussionists play some of the most dynamic and exciting pieces of a musical performance. Percussion instruments range from enormous bass drums to tiny finger cymbals, but the three most common percussion instruments in beginning school bands and orchestras are the snare drum, bells, and xylophone.

As a music student, or a parent of a music student, you will want to know some basics about your percussion instrument as soon as you start playing.


Snare Drum


Parts of the Snare Drum, Stand, and Drumsticks

Below is a diagram of the snare drum, stand, and drumsticks. Click on the image to enlarge it.

snare drum diagram


Setting Up the Snare Drum

1. Use the base screw (or wingnut) to loosen and tighten the legs on the stand. Open the stand wide enough to create a stable base for the instrument.
2. Carefully place the drum on top of the stand, referred to as the “cradle.”
3. Once securely in the cradle, tighten the wingnut at the bottom of the cradle until the stand has been tightened around the drum.
4. Adjust the height of the stand to waist-high. 
5. Hold the drum as you adjust the angle of the stand. The drum should be parallel to the floor.


Keyboard (Mallet) Percussion

The keyboard percussion family (also called the mallet percussion family) includes orchestral bells, xylophone, marimba, vibraphone and chimes. Each instrument is arranged chromatically in two rows similar to a piano keyboard. Because of the different materials used, each of these five instrument has its own unique sound. The two most common keyboard percussion instruments are the bells and xylophone.


Bells

Also called the Glockenspiel, orchestral bells are made from metal and produce a bright, charming sound. The instrument is played with hard-rubber mallets, or sometimes brass or plastic mallets.

bell kit
Xylophone

The xylophone is a percussion instrument with wooden bars. Each bar is a different length, so they play different notes when struck. A full-sized xylophone will have resonators to help make each note last longer. However, most students use a desktop xylophone which are smaller and more portable, and therefore much more convenient.  

 desktop xylophone

Related Articles


Have questions? Need advice? West Music is here for you! Give our school orchestra experts a call at 800-373-2000. 


Adapted with permission from Alfred Music's Sound Innovations for Concert Band 1: Percussion



Tags: band, beginner, snare drum, drums, percussion, xylophone, bells, alex beamer
Categories: Band & Orchestra, Drums & Percussion
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First Time French Horn Players
By Alex Beamer
8/1/2017 4:30:00 PM  

First Time French Horn Players

Congratulations on choosing to play the French horn. Whether you are new to music, new to the horn, or simply a parent of a new music student, you will want to know these basics soon after receiving your instrument.


Parts of the French Horn

Below is a diagram of the French horn. Click on the image to enlarge it.

french horn diagram

Assembling Your Instrument...CAREFULLY!

Even though it’s made of metal, your instrument is delicate and should be handled with care. Follow these instructions or the instructions given to you by your music director to prevent damaging the instrument.

1. Place the case on its side on a flat surface. Make sure the case is facing up.

2. Open the latches and carefully open the case.

3. Carefully pick up the instrument by its bell and outermost body. Avoid the valves since they can fall out!

4. Place the mouthpiece into the mouthpiece receiver (also called the lead pipe).

5. Gently twist the mouthpiece to the right to lock it into place being careful not to over tighten.

Putting It All Away

1. Remove the mouthpiece by gently twisting it to the left and place it in the mouthpiece holder in your case.

2. If your mouthpiece gets stuck, seek help from your teacher or from West Music’s repair team. We have a special tool to remove a stuck mouthpiece that will not damage the instrument.

3. Carefully rotate your horn to remove excess condensation from the lead pipe.

4. Wipe off the outside with a soft cloth.

5. Carefully place the instrument in the case and close all the latches.

6. Store only your instrument and its accessories in the case. Sheet music, folders, and other objects may bend the keys and damage the instrument.

Related Articles


Have questions? Need advice? West Music is here for you! Give our school band experts a call at 800-373-2000. 


Adapted with permission from Alfred Music's Sound Innovations for Concert Band 1: French Horn.



Tags: band, beginner, french horn, alex beamer
Categories: Band & Orchestra
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First Time Flute Players
By Alex Beamer
8/1/2017 3:27:00 PM  

First Time Flute Players

Congratulations on choosing the flute! Flutes and variations of flutes have been played not only all over the world, but all throughout history. Archeologists have even found flutes made from bone and played by cavemen! As a music student, or a parent of a music student, you will want to know these basics soon after purchasing or renting your flute from West Music. 

Parts of the Flute

Below is a diagram of the flute. Click on the image to enlarge it.

flute diagram

Assembling Your Flute…CAREFULLY!

1. Place your case on a steady surface, right side up.
2. Check to be sure the tenons are clean. These are the parts that slide together. Wipe gently with a soft, clean cloth if necessary.
3. Gently twist the head joint on to the main body being careful not to grip the keys to avoid bending them.
4. Gently twist the foot joint on to the main body.
5. Align the embouchure hole with the keys on the main body.
6. Align the rod of the foot joint with the keys on the main body.
7. Align the foot joint key rod so that it lines up with the center of the keys on the main body of the flute.
8. Gently twist the head joint onto the main body.
9. Align the embouchure hole with the keys of the main body.

 

Putting It All Away

1. Disassemble in reverse order of assembly.
2. Use the cleaning rod covered with a soft cleaning cloth to dry the inside of the instrument.
3. Wipe the outside of the instrument with the cleaning cloth.
4. Carefully place the instrument in the case and close all the latches.
5. Store only your instrument and its accessories in the case. Music, folders and other objects may bend keys and damage your flute.


Related Articles

 

Have questions? Need advice? West Music is here for you! Give our school band experts a call at 800-373-2000. 


Adapted with permission from Alfred Music's Sound Innovations for Band Book 1: Flute




Tags: band, beginner, flute, alex beamer
Categories: Band & Orchestra
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First Time Oboe Players
By Alex Beamer
8/1/2017 2:47:00 PM  

First Time Oboe Players

Congratulations on choosing to play the oboe. The oboe is both a challenging and rewarding instrument to learn. Whether you are new to playing music, new to the oboe, or a parent of a music student, you will want to know these basics soon after receiving your instrument.

Parts of the Oboe

Below is a diagram of the oboe. Click on the image to enlarge it.

oboe diagram

Double Reed

While most woodwinds use a single reed, oboes use something called a double reed. The term double reed comes from the fact that there are two pieces of wood cane (or some other material) vibrating against each other to create musical notes.

Assembling Your Instrument...CAREFULLY!

Your oboe is delicate and should be handled with care. Follow these instructions or the instructions given to you by your music director to prevent damaging the instrument.

1. Soak the reed in ¾ inch of water for at 2½ to 3 minutes.
2. Place the case on a flat surface and open right side up. Open the latches and carefully take out the instrument.
3. When needed, apply a small amount of cork grease to each cork. Clean your hands after applying.
4. Gently twist the bell onto the lower section of the instrument. Check to make sure the bell bridge keys are aligned.
5. Carefully lift the upper section with your left hand using your fingers to press down the three large keys to raise the bridge keys.
6. Carefully lift the lower section with your right hand close to the top. Do not press any keys on the lower section.
7. Gently twist the upper and lower sections together making sure the bridge keys are aligned.
8. Blow through the reed to remove excess water and carefully push the reed into the reed socket. Rotate the reed so that one flat side is aligned with the tone hole plates.

Putting It All Away

1. Remove the reed and blow out excess moisture.
2. Place the reed in a reed case. This helps it dry properly and last longer.
3. Disassemble in reverse order of assembly. Use the swab to dry the inside of the instrument. Wipe off the outside with a soft cloth.
4. Carefully place the instrument in the case and close all the latches.
5. Store only your instrument and its accessories in the case. Sheet music, folders, and other objects may bend the keys and damage the instrument.

Related Articles

Have questions? Need advice? West Music is here for you! Give our school band experts a call at 800-373-2000. 


Adapted with permission from Alfred Music's Sound Innovations for Concert Band 1: Oboe.



Tags: band, beginner, oboe, alex beamer
Categories: Band & Orchestra
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First Time Clarinet Players
By Alex Beamer
8/1/2017 1:38:00 PM  

First Time Clarinet Players

Congratulations on choosing to play the clarinet. Whether you are new to playing music in general, new to the clarinet, or a parent of a music student, you will want to know these basics soon after receiving your instrument.


Parts of the Clarinet

Below is a diagram of the clarinet. Click on the image to enlarge it.

clarinet diagram

Assembling Your Clarinet…CAREFULLY!

Your clarinet is delicate and should be handled with care. Follow these instructions or the instructions given to you by your music director to prevent damaging the instrument.

1. Place the thin end of the reed into your mouth or a container of water to moisten it.

2. Place your case on a steady surface right side up and open it carefully.

3. If needed, place a small amount of cork grease on each cork. Clean your hands after applying.

4. Gently twist the bell onto the lower section of the clarinet without squeezing the rods.

5. Hold the upper section in your left hand and press down on the tone hole rings. Twist the upper section into the lower section. Be sure to line up the tone holes and bridge keys.

6. Gently twist the large end of the barrel onto the upper section.

7. Remove the mouthpiece cap and ligature. Twist the mouthpiece into the barrel. Be sure to line up the flat part of the mouthpiece with the register key.

8. Add the ligature to the mouthpiece, then slide the thick end of the reed against the mouthpiece with the flat side against the rectangular opening. The reed should be centered and not extended above the top of the mouthpiece. Gently tighten the ligature screws to hold the reed in place.


Putting It All Away

1. Remove the ligature and reed from the mouthpiece.

2. Place the reed in a reed case. This helps it dry properly and last longer.

3. Disassemble in reverse order of assembly. Use the swab to dry the inside of the instrument. Wipe off the outside with a soft cloth.

4. Carefully place the instrument in the case and close all the latches.

5. Store only your instrument and its accessories in the case. Sheet music, folders, and other objects may bend the keys and damage the instrument.


Related Articles


Have questions? Need advice? West Music is here for you! Give our school band experts a call at 800-373-2000. 


Adapted with permission from Alfred Music's Sound Innovations for Concert Band 1: Clarinet




Tags: band, beginner, clarinet, alex beamer
Categories: Band & Orchestra
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First Time Alto Saxophone Players
By Alex Beamer
7/31/2017 4:18:00 PM  

First Time Alto Saxophone Players

Congratulations on choosing to play the alto saxophone. The saxophone, or “sax” as it’s often called, can be seen in all types of music including jazz. As a music student, or a parent of a music student, you will want to know these basics soon after receiving your instrument.

Alto vs Tenor Saxophones

Both the alto and tenor saxophones are part of the woodwind family, both use wooden reeds to create sound, and both make excellent beginner instruments! The major difference is that the alto sax is smaller than the tenor and produces higher tones.

Parts of the Alto Sax

Below is a diagram of the alto saxophone. Click on the image to enlarge it.
alto sax diagram

Assembling Your Saxophone…CAREFULLY!

Even though it’s made of metal, your saxophone is delicate and should be handled with care. Follow these instructions or the instructions given to you by your music director to prevent damaging the instrument.

1. Place on a steady surface right side up.

2. Open the case and find your neckstrap. Place the neckstrap over your head so the hook is in front and the pad is resting on the back of your neck.

3. Place the thin end of the reed into your mouth or a container of water to moisten it. 4. Remove the mouthpiece cap and ligature. Gently twist the mouthpiece onto the neck cork so about half the cork is visible. When needed, place a small amount of cork grease onto the neck cork. Be sure the flat part of the mouthpiece is facing down.

5. Add the ligature to the mouthpiece, then slide the thick end of the reed against the mouthpiece with the flat side against the rectangular opening. The reed should be centered and not extend above the top of the mouthpiece. Gently tighten the ligature screws to hold the reed in place.

6. Carefully lift the main body of the saxophone out of the case. Be careful not to hold it by the keys or rod.

7. Remove the end cap from the upper opening in the main body and return it to your case. Loosen the neck screw.

8. Gently twist the neck into position. Do not rock the neck into place or try to twist in a full circle, and never hold the saxophone by its neck!

9. Once the connection with the octave key is in its correct position with the key on the neck closed, tighten the neck screw.

10. Place the hook of the neckstrap into the ring on the back of the saxophone.

 

Putting It All Away

1. Remove the ligature and reed from the mouthpiece.

2. Place the reed in a reed case. This helps it dry properly and last longer.

3. Disassemble in reverse order of assembly. Use the saxophone swab to dry the inside of the instrument. Wipe off the outside with a soft cloth.

4. Carefully place the instrument in the case and close all the latches.

5. Store only your instrument and its accessories in the case. Sheet music, folders, and other objects may bend the keys and damage the instrument.


Related Articles


Have questions? Need advice? West Music is here for you! Give our school band experts a call at 800-373-2000. 


Adapted with permission from Alfred Music's Sound Innovations for Concert Band 1: Alto Sax.



Tags: band, beginner, alto sax, saxophone, alex beamer
Categories: Band & Orchestra
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First Time Viola Players
By Katie Senn
7/31/2017 2:21:00 PM  

First Time Viola Players

Congratulations on choosing the viola! The viola is the alto voice of the orchestral string world; it is in a lower pitch that violin, but higher pitch than the cello. It is also an excellent first instrument, because it's available in fractional sizes, allowing children to size up as they grow. As a music student, or a parent of a music student, you will want to know these basics soon after purchasing or renting your instrument from West Music.

Parts of the Viola

Below is a diagram of the viola. Click on the image to enlarge it.
viola diagram

Taking Your Viola Out of Its Case... CAREFULLY!

The viola is a fragile instrument and should be handled with care. Follow these instructions or the instructions given to you by your music director to prevent damaging the instrument.

1. Place your instrument case on a flat, steady surface.
2. Make sure the case is facing upwards before opening.
3. Release any Velcro or ties holding down the instrument.
4. Gently lift the viola out of its case and hold it with both hands.

Before packing up your instrument, make sure to clean the viola and its bow with a soft cloth. Cleaning the instrument, bow, and strings will help maintain the protective varnish on the wood and help the strings last longer. Then, carefully place the viola back into its case, again using both hands. Make sure every buckle or snap is fastened and every zipper fully closed before picking up the case again.

Holding Your Viola

Another key skill to learn early on is how to properly hold your viola. You can do so by following the 3 basic steps outlined below. However, you should have your child ask their music director or instructor for more specific directions including proper posture.

1. Start by holding your viola over your head. The instrument will be parallel to the floor with the scroll facing towards your left.
2. Lower it onto your left shoulder.
3. Place the chin rest under the left side your jaw, keeping the violin level with the floor.


Related Articles


Have questions? Need advice? West Music is here for you! Give our school orchestra experts a call at 800-373-2000. 

Adapted with permission from Alfred Music's Sound Innovations for String Orchestra 1: Viola.



Tags: beginner, orchestra, viola, katie senn
Categories: Band & Orchestra
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