Sonor Palisono TAKX 100 Tenor-Alto Xylophone

Brand: Sonor

Item: #201738
In Stock, Ready to Ship!
$30.00

$810.00

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Our Perspective

This was the very first Orff instrument I purchased when starting out as an elementary music teacher for the same reasons you will today.

  • With two octaves, it is possible to have two students play at one time
  • The fiberglass bars weren’t affected by cold or heat so the instrument could sit in my car overnight without any worries

Now this xylophone includes two pairs of mallets to make this even easier for use in the classroom, church or anywhere at all!  -Judy

Description

Sonor fiberglass tenor-alto xylophone; diatonic, C1 to C3, with F# and Bb (19 bars); solid wood resonator box. The fiberglass bars are overtone tuned to A=440, the industry standard. Palisono (fiberglass) xylophones have a similar resonance to rosewood xylophones. Their advantage is that palisono is not hygroscopic (pitch is not affected by changes in temperature or humidity), so these bars are ideal for humid climates. Sonor tenor-alto xylophones are unique because they cover a range of two full octaves, giving you space for more children to play on the same instrument. Comes with TWO pair of Sonor SCH 50 felt mallets. By having TWO pairs of mallets with each diatonic tenor/alto instrument from Sonor, allows the possibility of two students to use the same instrument at once! What a value for the money - two students on one instrument.

 

Dimensions of resonator box are approximately:
33-1/4" long.
8-7/8" high.
7-3/4" wide at widest point; 4-5/8" wide at narrowest point.   

With the bars on, the widest point is approximately 10-3/4" wide (the length of the C2 bar).

Reviews

5.0 (based on 2 customer reviews)

Conversation

Start typing your question and we'll check if it was already asked and answered. Learn More
I am wondering if the pins on the Sonor instruments break off as easily as they do on the Studio 49 instruments. When they break off flush to the wood we have to dig them out and it is really a pain. Any advice?
Nancy H on May 27, 2016
BEST ANSWER: These instruments tend to have the same issue. We typically suggest using a smaller drill bit to pry the broken pins out, and they can be drilled out if necessary.

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